Christopher Jenks's picture
Humanitarian Law & Policy:
Children in Armed Conflict, Classification of Conflicts, Conduct of Hostilities, Detention in Armed Conflict, Enforcement, Human Rights in Armed Conflict, Humanitarian Law in Practice, Implementation, Integrated Missions and Peacekeeping, International Criminal Law, International Humanitarian Law, Protection of Civilians, Terrorism and Counterterrorism

<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal;">Chris Jenks is an assistant professor of law and directs the criminal justice clinic at the SMU Dedman School of Law in Dallas, Texas.</span></p>

<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal;">He teaches and writes on the law of armed conflict (LOAC) and criminal justice. Professor Jenks is the co-author of a LOAC textbook, co-editor of a forthcoming war crimes casebook, and served as a peer reviewer of the Talinn Manual on the international law applicable to cyber warfare.</span></p>

<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal;">He has published articles on drones, child soldiers, extraordinary rendition, law of war based detention, targeting and government contractors. He has also spoken on those same topics at universities and institutes in Australia, Brazil, Italy, South Africa and the U.S., and with the militaries of the Republic of Yemen and several different European and African countries. &nbsp;He recently served as a consultant to the Office of the Secretary of Defense on U.S. military security sector reform in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.</span></p>

<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal;">Prior to joining the SMU faculty, Professor Jenks served for over 20 years in the military. Following graduation from law school, Professor Jenks transitioned to the U.S. Army JAG Corps and was assigned as the primary international and operational law advisor near the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea. Following his return to the U.S. in 2003, Professor Jenks served as the lead prosecutor in the Army&rsquo;s first counterterrorism case. In 2004, he deployed to Mosul, Iraq where he advised investigations and served as prosecutor for crimes against the civilian population, detainee abuse, and fratricide.</span></p>

<p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal;">While at the Department of State, Professor Jenks served at the U.S. mission to the United Nations in New York City and represented the U.S. during en US during negotiations on cultural and humanitarian resolutions pending before the Third Committee of the UN General Assembly. Professor Jenks also served as the Army&rsquo;s international law branch chief. In this position, he oversaw the foreign exercise of criminal jurisdiction over US service members, represented the Department of Defense at status of forces agreement negotiations and served as the legal advisor to the U.S. Military Observers Group, which provides military officers to United Nations Missions around the world.</span></p>